ANNUAL DRINKING WATER QUALITY REPORT
Shrewsbury Municipal Water Company

June 27, 2001

     Shrewsbury Municipal Water Company is pleased to present to you this year's Annual Drinking Water Quality Report.  This report is designed to inform you about the quality water and services we deliver to you every day. Our constant goal is to provide you with a dependable supply of drinking water. We want you to understand the efforts we make to continually improve the water treatment process and protect our water resources. We are committed to ensuring the quality of your water. Our water sources consist of seven wells and a springhouse, which are all groundwater sources located in Shrewsbury Borough or Township.  The north water system contains the Woodlyn Well, located in the Woodlyn Springs development, the Meadow Well, located in the Brookview Meadows development, the Blouse Well, located in the Bridlewood Estates development, and the Pumphouse springs, located northeast of the intersection of Interstate 83 and SR851.  The south water system contains the Village Well, located in the Shrewsbury Lutheran Village, the Home Well, also located in the Lutheran Village, the Smith Well, located in the Southern Farms development, and the Thompson Well, located on Cloverdale Avenue.  All of our water sources draw from the fractured Wissahickon bedrock formation.

       Shrewsbury has formed a Wellhead Protection Committee to protect our water sources.  The Committee meets every month with Shrewsbury Borough, Township, and Hopewell Township representatives present.  Currently, the Committee is preparing an ordinance for the surrounding municipalities to adopt for protection of our water supplies.  The Wellhead Protection Committee has constructed delineations and listed possible contaminant specifics for each water source.  Aerial photographs will accompany the plan when it is submitted for state approval.  The Wellhead Protection Committee’s objective is to educate the public about Shrewsbury’s Water System and protect the system for present and future generations.  All information collected by the Wellhead Committee can be obtained by contacting the Public Works Department at (717)235-1427.  All interested are invited to join the committee and/or attend a meeting.

      Shrewsbury is pleased to report that our drinking water meets federal and state requirements.  If you have any questions about this report or concerning your water utility, please contact Brian Sweitzer, Superintendent of Shrewsbury Municipal Water Company, at (717) 235-1427.  If you want to learn more, please attend any of our regular scheduled meetings.  The Shrewsbury Borough Council meets on the second Wednesday of every month at 7:30PM in the borough building.

      We want our valued customers to be informed about their water utility.

      Shrewsbury Municipal Water Company routinely monitors for constituents in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. This table shows the results of our monitoring for the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2000All drinking water, including bottled drinking water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some constituents.  It's important to remember that the presence of these constituents does not necessarily pose a health risk.

 In this table you will find many terms and abbreviations with which you might not be familiar. To help you better understand these terms, we've provided the following definitions:

 Non-Detects (ND) - laboratory analysis indicates that the contaminant is not present at a detectable level. 

Parts per million (ppm) or Milligrams per liter (mg/l) - one part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.

Parts per billion (ppb) or Micrograms per liter - one part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.

Action Level – The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow. 

Maximum Contaminant Level - The “Maximum Allowed” (MCL) is the highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water.  MCLs are set as close to the MCLGs as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal - The “Goal”(MCLG) is the level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health.  MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. 

TEST RESULTS

Inorganic Contaminants

Contaminant (Unit of measurement)

Violation

Y/N

Level

Detected

Range

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source of Contamination

   Barium (ppm)

NO

0.05

.0020-..05

 

2

2

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

  Nitrate (as Nitrogen) (ppm)

NO

9.63

6.27-9.63

10

10

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

 Copper (ppm)

 NO

 1.15

0.11-2.32

1.3

AL=1.3

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits; leaching from wood preservatives

 Lead (ppb)

NO

  4.6

0.5 - 12.0

0

AL=15

Corrosion of household plumbing systems, erosion of natural deposits

 

Synthetic Organic Contaminants including Pesticides and Herbicides

Contaminant (Unit of measurement)

Violation

Y/N

Level

Detected

Range

MCLG

MCL

Likely Source of Contamination

27. At   Atrazine (ppm)

NO

.00028

.00016-.00028

 

.003

.003

Runoff from herbicide used on row crops

       Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant you should ask advice from your health care provider.

     What does this mean?

     As you can see by the table, our system had no violations. We’re proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements. We have learned through our monitoring and testing that some constituents have been detected. 

     All sources of drinking water are subject to potential contamination by constituents that are naturally occurring or man made.  Those constituents can be microbes, organic or inorganic chemicals, or radioactive materials.  All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

     The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells.  As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity.

      MCL’s are set at very stringent levels for health effects. To understand the possible health effects described for many regulated constituents, a person would have to drink 2 liters of water every day at the MCL level for a lifetime to have a one-in-a-million chance of having the described health effect.

      Nitrates: As a precaution we always notify physicians and health care providers in this area if there is ever a higher than normal level of nitrates in the water supply.

      Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/CDC guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by cryptosporidium and other microbiological contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (800-426-4791). 

      Please call our office if you have questions.

      We at the Shrewsbury Municipal Water Company work around the clock to provide top quality water to every tap.  We ask that all our customers help us protect our water sources, which are the heart of our community, our way of life and our children’s future.

Disclaimer:
The information provided herein is for convenience and informational purposes only. Shrewsbury Borough 
assumes no responsibility for errors and omissions nor any liability for damage resulting from the use 
of information contained herein. Users are cautioned to consult the official records of the borough 
for any changes, amendments or updates to any information provided herein.
Copyright 2001 by Shrewsbury Borough

08/16/2001